International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2016 - Volume 11 Issue 9, pp. 3351-3359
  • Published Online: 19 Nov 2016
  • Article Views: 733 | Article Download: 544
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Di Paola B. Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(9), 3351-3359.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Di Paola, 2016)
Reference: Di Paola, B. (2016). Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(9), 3351-3359.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Di Paola, 2016)
Reference: Di Paola, Benedetto. "Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2016 11 no. 9 (2016): 3351-3359.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Di Paola, 2016)
Reference: Di Paola, B. (2016). Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(9), pp. 3351-3359.
MLA
In-text citation: (Di Paola, 2016)
Reference: Di Paola, Benedetto "Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 11, no. 9, 2016, pp. 3351-3359.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Di Paola B. Why Asian children outperform students from other countries? Linguistic and parental influences comparing Chinese and Italian children in Preschool Education. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(9):3351-9.

Abstract

This paper focusing on the complex situation of the Italian multiculturalism and trying to reply to why Asian children mathematically outperform students from other countries, discusses from the epistemological point of view, Chinese children’s skills before to start their formal education in Italian educational school context. A review of the literature, comparing pre-schoolers competences of Asian and Western students, reveals two important influenced factors: linguistic and parental stimuli. In particular many researchers showed that the structure of the Chinese language provides in children a head start in basic math skills, for example to discover, since preschool activities, a pre-algebraic structures of writing. An example with numbers is shown in the paper.
Other studies also show that Asian parents, compared to the Western cultures ones, tend to promote in a strong way the development of good basic mathematics skills and a stronger epistemological discipline foundation.
A general framework on these two important aspects for the education context is presented with the aim to help teacher and researchers to better understand Chinese and Italian possible different cognitive styles in mathematics learning just from Preschool.

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