International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2016 - Volume 11 Issue 7, pp. 2373-2401
  • Published Online: 03 Sep 2016
  • Article Views: 682 | Article Download: 686
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Liuа Y, Tagueb J, Somayajulub R. What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(7), 2373-2401.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Liuа et al., 2016)
Reference: Liuа, Y., Tagueb, J., & Somayajulub, R. (2016). What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(7), 2373-2401.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Liuа et al., 2016)
Reference: Liuа, Yating, Jenna Tagueb, and Ravi Somayajulub. "What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2016 11 no. 7 (2016): 2373-2401.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Liuа et al., 2016)
Reference: Liuа, Y., Tagueb, J., and Somayajulub, R. (2016). What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(7), pp. 2373-2401.
MLA
In-text citation: (Liuа et al., 2016)
Reference: Liuа, Yating et al. "What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 11, no. 7, 2016, pp. 2373-2401.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Liuа Y, Tagueb J, Somayajulub R. What Do Eighth Grade Students Look for When Determining If a Mathematical Argument Is Convincing. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(7):2373-401.

Abstract

Existing research have found that students’ creation and evaluation of mathematical proofs was inconsistent across content areas. Investigation into an explanation of the phenomena requires an analysis of students’ thinking processes when they conduct an evaluation of mathematical arguments. This study is conceptualized to contribute to this investigation. The analysis investigated the aspects and features of arguments that impacted students’ evaluation of the arguments. Eight 8th grade students participated in the interviews where they were asked to explain their rationale in evaluating arguments that justify conjectures from multiple strands of school mathematics. Interview data was coded using the Classification of Mathematical Argument (CMA) framework to identify the aspects and features of arguments that impacted students’ evaluation of the arguments. A detailed analysis of each subject’s interview response documented the complexity of each individual’s rationale and offered descriptions of the various differences among individuals. Despite such individual differences, the study also revealed a common theme among the subjects in their reasoning, i.e. the accepted statements in an argument, instead of its mode of presentation or mode of argumentation, had the largest impact on the subjects’ evaluation of an argument.

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