International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2016 - Volume 11 Issue 10, pp. 3521-3536
  • Published Online: 02 Dec 2016
  • Article Views: 1159 | Article Download: 1468
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Ayele MA. Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(10), 3521-3536.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Ayele, 2016)
Reference: Ayele, M. A. (2016). Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(10), 3521-3536.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Ayele, 2016)
Reference: Ayele, Mulugeta Atnafu. "Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2016 11 no. 10 (2016): 3521-3536.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Ayele, 2016)
Reference: Ayele, M. A. (2016). Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(10), pp. 3521-3536.
MLA
In-text citation: (Ayele, 2016)
Reference: Ayele, Mulugeta Atnafu "Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 11, no. 10, 2016, pp. 3521-3536.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Ayele MA. Mathematics Teachers’ Perceptions on Enhancing Students’ Creativity in Mathematics. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(10):3521-36.

Abstract

Creativity is a necessary and vital tool for dealing with the economic, environmental, and humanitarian challenges of the 21st century. It is also a necessary tool for brainstorming, strategizing, and solving problems. Exploratory survey design and quantitative research method were used. 102 in-service mathematics teachers were selected using stratified random sampling from two programs. The data was collected by a likert scale, and analyzed by mean, standard deviation, correlation, independent sample t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA. Most of the in-service mathematics teachers felt that they encourage and reward students’ creative ideas and different approaches in their work; motivate students engaging with mathematics; apply regularly strong background knowledge in mathematics; allow mistakes and encourage learning from their mistakes; encourage mental flexibility; explore the environment to stimulate curiosity about their world; ask questions to students and guide them to do problems differently; encourage dissent and diversity; and provide regularly positive feedback.Therefore, training given to mathematics teachers; teachers identify mathematically creative students and apply appropriate teaching methods and assessment techniques; creativity should be made compulsory and integrated in all school mathematics curriculum; schools create of the creative environment; awareness given to parents and  the Ministry of Education review the Teacher Education program.

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