International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2008 - Volume 3 Issue 2, pp. 96-109
  • Published Online: 08 Aug 2008
  • Article Views: 1198 | Article Download: 2047
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Thompson T. Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2008;3(2), 96-109.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Thompson, 2008)
Reference: Thompson, T. (2008). Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 3(2), 96-109.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Thompson, 2008)
Reference: Thompson, Tony. "Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2008 3 no. 2 (2008): 96-109.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Thompson, 2008)
Reference: Thompson, T. (2008). Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 3(2), pp. 96-109.
MLA
In-text citation: (Thompson, 2008)
Reference: Thompson, Tony "Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 3, no. 2, 2008, pp. 96-109.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Thompson T. Mathematics Teachers’ Interpretation of Higher-Order Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2008;3(2):96-109.

Abstract

This study investigated mathematics teachers’ interpretation of higher-order thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy. Thirty-two high school mathematics teachers from the southeast U.S. were asked to (a) define lower- and higher-order thinking, (b) identify which thinking skills in Bloom’s Taxonomy represented lower- and higher-order thinking, and (c) create an Algebra I final exam item representative of each thinking skill. Results indicate that mathematics teachers have difficulty interpreting the thinking skills in Bloom’s Taxonomy and creating test items for higher-order thinking. Alternatives to using Bloom’s Taxonomy to help mathematics teachers assess for higher-order thinking are discussed.

References

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License

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.