International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2017 - Volume 12 Issue 3, pp. 503-520
  • Published Online: 19 Jul 2017
  • Article Views: 494 | Article Download: 798
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Jaafar R, Lin Y. Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2017;12(3), 503-520.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Jaafar & Lin, 2017)
Reference: Jaafar, R., & Lin, Y. (2017). Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 12(3), 503-520.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Jaafar and Lin, 2017)
Reference: Jaafar, Reem, and Yan Lin. "Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2017 12 no. 3 (2017): 503-520.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Jaafar and Lin, 2017)
Reference: Jaafar, R., and Lin, Y. (2017). Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 12(3), pp. 503-520.
MLA
In-text citation: (Jaafar and Lin, 2017)
Reference: Jaafar, Reem et al. "Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 12, no. 3, 2017, pp. 503-520.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Jaafar R, Lin Y. Assessment for Learning in the Calculus Classroom: A Proactive Approach to Engage Students in Active Learning. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2017;12(3):503-20.

Abstract

There is a variety of classroom assessment techniques we can use in the college classroom (Angelo and Cross, 1993). In an effort to diagnose and identify gaps between students’ learning and classroom teaching, we implemented weekly short assessments in a calculus I classroom at an urban community college in the United States. The goals of these assessments were to identify misconceptions, and address them using an appropriate intervention. In this paper, we share these assessments, how they can be used to cement students’ conceptual learning, and how it can help the instructor develop insights into students’ misunderstandings. We also share students’ feedback, challenges and implications for practitioners.

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