International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2016 - Volume 11 Issue 1, pp. 317-325
  • Published Online: 10 Apr 2016
  • Article Views: 597 | Article Download: 1577
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Valeeva RA, Vafina DI, Bulatbayeva AA. Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(1), 317-325.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Valeeva et al., 2016)
Reference: Valeeva, R. A., Vafina, D. I., & Bulatbayeva, A. A. (2016). Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(1), 317-325.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Valeeva et al., 2016)
Reference: Valeeva, Roza A., Dilara I. Vafina, and Aygul A. Bulatbayeva. "Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2016 11 no. 1 (2016): 317-325.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Valeeva et al., 2016)
Reference: Valeeva, R. A., Vafina, D. I., and Bulatbayeva, A. A. (2016). Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(1), pp. 317-325.
MLA
In-text citation: (Valeeva et al., 2016)
Reference: Valeeva, Roza A. et al. "Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 11, no. 1, 2016, pp. 317-325.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Valeeva RA, Vafina DI, Bulatbayeva AA. Alternative Education: Comparative Study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan Experience. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(1):317-25.

Abstract

The article presents the results of comparative study of the American, Russian and Kazakhstan experience of alternative education. It reveals the implementation of alternative ideas in schools of Russia and Kazakhstan. The article describes the  students’ attitude to the alternative education in American and Russian schools. The study was held in a number of Montessori schools in Minnesota USA (Sunshine Montessori School, Seward Montessori School, Great River School). Methods of observation, survey, questionnaire, personal interviews with students and teachers of schools were used. Questioning of American students was held in Great River School. The study surveyed 100 school students. They answered questions about their learning experiences in an alternative school. The questionnaire was anonymous and consisted of 14 questions. The questions were both of direct and expanded character, with a choice of options. Russian students from three secondary schools in the Republic of Tatarstan, Kazan answered the same questions. The study showed that despite the differences in the production of alternative education in the United States and Russia, among the characteristics of alternative education inherent in the American and Russian schools, students noted student-centered character of education, overcoming authoritarianism in teaching and creativity and cognitive activity.

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