International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2017 - Volume 12 Issue 3, pp. 549-559
  • Published Online: 22 Jul 2017
  • Article Views: 330 | Article Download: 430
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Johnson J. A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2017;12(3), 549-559.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Johnson, 2017)
Reference: Johnson, J. (2017). A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 12(3), 549-559.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Johnson, 2017)
Reference: Johnson, Jason. "A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2017 12 no. 3 (2017): 549-559.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Johnson, 2017)
Reference: Johnson, J. (2017). A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 12(3), pp. 549-559.
MLA
In-text citation: (Johnson, 2017)
Reference: Johnson, Jason "A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 12, no. 3, 2017, pp. 549-559.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Johnson J. A Topic Revisited: Students in the Republic of the Maldives Writing Contextual Word Problems. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2017;12(3):549-59.

Abstract

Students dislike for solving word problems is not new for mathematics teachers. Most word problems have no cultural significance or relate to the student. A student dislike for solving word problems could be contributed to the lack of reference to the lived experience of the student (i.e., social class, race, ethnicity, mother language, gender, sexual orientation, and any other demographic characteristics). А study was designed to explore a group of students, on the island of Kuda Hudaa in the Republic of the Maldives, ability to write contextual word problems. Contextual word problems are word problems that relate to a student population in a classroom. The results indicate that all students were able to create contextual word problems for both multiplication and division. Most student written multiplication and division word problems met Marks (1994) three considerations when developing word problems. The intent is to encourage students to write contextual word problems that make learning mathematics more meaningful for students.

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